20170208

15 sublimes pruebas de la natural magnificencia de nuestro mundo



photos, earth, nature, photo competition


photos, earth, nature, photo competition

The giant hulk of the Costa Concordia will set sail on its final voyage to the scrap heap on Wednesday... to the huge disappointment of locals who say it not only boosted their economy but introduced them to new foods as well.
The stricken liner now sits higher in the water than at any point since it struck a rock and capsized on January 13 2012 thanks to a massive re-floating operation, that lays bare in sobering detail how two-and-a-half years under the sea turned this once-bustling ocean pleasure palace into a rusting and empty ghost ship.
To many around the world, the shipwreck was seen as something of an eyesore for the Italian isle of Giglio; but for those who live there, 'it finally put [us] on the map'.
When it sank, killing 32 people, there were fears its upturned hull and grim associations with death would scare holidaymakers away from the island. And it did.
But in their place came thousands of divers and engineers from all over the world who have spent 30 months on an unprecedented project to refloat the ship before it embarks on its last cruise to Genoa for scrapping.

Ready to go: When it sank in January 2012 killing 32 people, there were fears its rusting upturned hull and grim associations with death would scare holidaymakers away from the island
<img id="i-6766dc8f2dd0726a" src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2014/07/21/article-2699943-1FD7B55C00000578-920_964x630.jpg" height="630" width="964" alt="Ready to go: When it sank in January 2012 killing 32 people, there were fears its rusting upturned hull and grim associations with death would scare holidaymakers away from the island" class="blkBorder img-share"/>
Ready to go: When it sank in January 2012 killing 32 people, there were fears its rusting upturned hull and grim associations with death would scare holidaymakers away from the island
Workforce: But in their place came thousands of divers and engineers from all over the world who have spent 30 months on an unprecedented project to refloat the ship for scrapping

<img id="i-1710b8a878043142" src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2014/07/21/article-2699943-1FD54A4400000578-151_964x626.jpg" height="626" width="964" alt="Workforce: But in their place came thousands of divers and engineers from all over the world who have spent 30 months on an unprecedented project to refloat the ship for scrapping" class="blkBorder img-share"/>
Workforce: But in their place came thousands of divers and engineers from all over the world who have spent 30 months on an unprecedented project to refloat the ship for scrapping


the past two and a half years, men and women from the U.S., U.K., Holland, Spain and the Italian mainland have worked around the clock, seven days a week in their efforts to right the ship.
In the early mornings, bars and restaurants fill with professionals looking to relax after a long night shift, while the evenings are even busier when the day workers clock off.
Floated: The 290-metre liner, which smashed into rocks off the picturesque holiday island in January 2012 with the loss of 32 lives, has for nine months been sitting deep in the water, resting on a specially-constructed platform made of steel girders and thousands of sacks of cement

<img id="i-f62ffaa3d99ecc68" src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2014/07/21/article-2699943-1FD7A34E00000578-39_964x643.jpg" height="643" width="964" alt="Floated: The 290-metre liner, which smashed into rocks off the picturesque holiday island in January 2012 with the loss of 32 lives, has for nine months been sitting deep in the water, resting on a specially-constructed platform made of steel girders and thousands of sacks of cement" class="blkBorder img-share"/>
Floated: The 290-metre liner, which smashed into rocks off the picturesque holiday island in January 2012 with the loss of 32 lives, has for nine months been sitting deep in the water, resting on a specially-constructed platform made of steel girders and thousands of sacks of cement
Resolve: Tug boat, Resove, floats ready in position to tow the luxury cruise ship away as soon as authorities give the green light

<img id="i-a0e29ca4dfdeebe0" src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2014/07/21/article-2699943-1FD7AD5800000578-23_964x569.jpg" height="569" width="964" alt="Resolve: Tug boat, Resove, floats ready in position to tow the luxury cruise ship away as soon as authorities give the green light" class="blkBorder img-share"/>
Resolve: Tug boat, Resove, floats ready in position to tow the luxury cruise ship away as soon as authorities give the green light
Turn off: When it sank in January 2012 killing 32 people, there were fears its rusting upturned hull and grim associations with death would scare holidaymakers away from the island

<img id="i-6710b8db4e046e99" src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2014/07/21/article-2699943-1FD77ADC00000578-621_964x641.jpg" height="641" width="964" alt="Turn off: When it sank in January 2012 killing 32 people, there were fears its rusting upturned hull and grim associations with death would scare holidaymakers away from the island" class="blkBorder img-share"/>
Turn off: When it sank in January 2012 killing 32 people, there were fears its rusting upturned hull and grim associations with death would scare holidaymakers away from the island
For the scrap heap: The cruise liner will be demolished and scrapped in a port near Genoa by a consortium including oil services company Saipem and Genoa-based companies Mariotti and San Giorgio

<img id="i-1421e55bbd4590dc" src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2014/07/21/article-2699943-1FD8F85700000578-721_964x642.jpg" height="642" width="964" alt="For the scrap heap: The cruise liner will be demolished and scrapped in a port near Genoa by a consortium including oil services company Saipem and Genoa-based companies Mariotti and San Giorgio" class="blkBorder img-share"/>
For the scrap heap: The cruise liner will be demolished and scrapped in a port near Genoa by a consortium including oil services company Saipem and Genoa-based companies Mariotti and San Giorgio
Until now, hotels, eateries, shops and bars which used to open from March to October for the tourist season have stayed open all year round to provide for the salvers and visiting relatives
'The accident finally put Giglio on the map,' said Gertraud Lang Schildberger, an Austrian-born 71-year-old who has lived on the island with her Italian husband since 1968 and runs an apartment rental company in the port.
'These young men who speak all kinds of languages have internationalised the locals, even changing what we eat and drink. Some restaurants added foreign dishes to the menu and we got special beers and liquors in for them,' she said.
Not only has the salvage site helped the island's economy but its sea life as well. 



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